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20130801
20130831
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 378 (some duplicates have been removed)
youer is if we have a comprehensive report about all of the, all of the teacher america impacts on all of the schools in the district, as you know, i have recently, raised the issue about certain schools, where they are and by the way it is not a secret. because teacher america tells all of the graduates and all of the funders and the public this. what we are doing is getting ourselves into all of the parts of the school districts. we want to take over this and take over that. and there are schools in our district where there are administrators and teacher of america graduate and they are biased in favor of teacher of america graduate and they go to events where they say, okay, teacher for america graduates now that you are an administrative positions we want you to focus on hiring teach for america interns and so i want you to tell us how much of that we are we have in our school district so that we can know that it is not just a sort of silent creeping take over if we were going to do it, somebody is going to have tell me, that we want to have this company do this for and yous that f
you know abraham's work very well you joined in 2,003 as the america cultural and community center youth program coordinate 98or for over a decade he has provided services to the arab couldn't health and education and immigration his days start in the early mornings, commuting between court appointments homes of low increase and disabled clints, hospitals and schools and his work leads into the late evenings he can be found in the late trip ac's where he tutors nearly 50 america youth to help them understand the important of education their futures in the world and academic excellence his mint doesn't stop at mentoring he helps many student pursue scholarships to per view their dreams for higher education he understand the value and importance of community service and empowering our people to be strong and proud and conscious and capable members of the community who never forgot their heritage. so abraham, on behalf of the city and county of the san francisco x we will like to presented you with the 2012 distinguished service award. (applause). >>> thank you all and i appreciate
is pictures by google's street view. the images capture sites of america where rates of poverty and unemployment are high and educational opportunities are slim. photographs from a new american picture were included in the new photography 2011 exhibition at mona in new york. and also has been seen at exhibitions at la ball in paris and pier 21 here in san francisco. a monograph was published in 2011. and it is represented by local galleries and sf galleries would like to thank steven orts and the staff for the support of this event. we asked doug to speak today in order to draw threads from his work until asketon has street view which is currently on view in the gallery. doug i will turn it over to you. >> thanks for coming. i appreciate it. i am looking forward to giving you some details on this. i have 15 minutes, so i am not going to talk about all of them. there are so many layers of consideration to this and each of these areas could sort of veer off into its own talk and so i am going to talk to some of the things that may overlap with aaron's work. and i want to go throug
everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the cit
of america that defined culture and music today. having said that about her mother, i feel i should balance that by saying i cannot count on my fingers and toes together all of the otherwise party intellectuals and regular people who have confided [unintelligible] [laughter] i am wondering. she is the editor and publisher of "the nation." she is summa cum laude from princeton. she is here with her first collection, "fighting for progress in the age of obama." i do not always agree with her personally when it comes to politics. we are here to find out from katrina how we're going to save the world with barack obama. let's start there. [laughter] >> i do not know how you learned by worked at national lampoon. saving the world. let me begin by saying how low they must be to go that low in new orleans. i would not put in the same sentence president obama and saving the world. it is very much about movements and the power in our history to bring about a fundamental change. you do need people inside, political leaders inside. it captures the imagination of the nation. through the turbulent histor
among the city's office of economic and work force development, the port and the america's cup committee regarding the pilot donor program david campos recognition program in association with one sf celebrate the cup at piers 27-29. ~ >> good afternoon, commissioners and executive darer. i'm kerry mcclellan with the san francisco's america's cup organizing committee. it's nice to be back before you again. i'm building on the presentation that happened in april, earlier when we came before you with the first concept of the pilot donor program, which is one of the tranches of our work in raising funds and awareness to support the city and county of san francisco and its departments in hosting the 34th america's cup. we've created the strategic campaign called one sf celebrate the cup, both very principally about raising funds, but also through building awareness of the community and legacy benefits. not only of the america's cup, but it's a nice dovetail with the 150th anniversary of the port as well. and all the city and port has leveraged through the planning and preparation for the even
by the bank of america this would not have been possible without you. to our partners the city and port of san francisco and the agencies that approved this project unanimously to bring it here. six different boards and six unanimous votes. >> and finally who welcomed us and even this fabulous institution across the street, dan, thank you. our founder, frank openhimer when he started the exporatorium created something unlike it in the rest of the we woulder. it led to the movement of thousand of similar institutions since that time and never really wanted to call it a museum and he searched for a different word and it was our neighborhood across the street, who sat down with frank to come up with the word exporatorium. but to us, the staff, we really believe that it is this wonderful, zany public, learning laboratory. and where we get to invent and create things all of the time and now we have this beautiful new platform of which to do that work. but it took my predecessor who is also here today, a french physicist. to boldly declare that it is not a place, but an idea, an idea and way of thin
america i move forward from kansas city so i know that middle america looks up to san francisco. so what can the city's do not only the tech world is leading the world but in the technology industries they're not as progressive as in the tech community part what are your thoughts in the tech community leading the way to be more progressive on immigration and the city of san francisco leading the way for other cities of embracing immigrants. people not knowing we pay the same taxes and have the same obliterations as the rest of the americans. so what can the city and a tech destroy do. that's why the silicon leadership group who have all those members to make sure that all clusters emphasize the need for all immigration. we want to get to one more person >> i'm here actually, i went through the exact same issue i was a foreign student and it took me looked at to get the green card. i'm not sure in the category i see less than 20 thousand people in america - the question i have why people say the farm worker when you look at the - they have the h1 b visa which means allowing both peo
what made america great is an independent, vigorous presence. if a jerk burns a flag, america is not threatened. political speech is the heart of the first amendment. they're expressing their religious beliefs. now is the time to make justice a reality for all of god's children. captioning provided by the freedom forum first amendment center welcome to speaking freely, a weekly conversation about the first amendment and free expression. i'm ken paulson, executive director of the first amendment center, and this is a special edition of the program in recognition of banned books week. it features three very special guests. they include judy blume, one of this country's most popular and most frequently censored authors, carolivia herron, whose critically-acclaimed book, nappy hair, was challenged in a brooklyn school, and cammie mannino, a bookseller who took a stand against censorship. welcome to all of you. i have to begin with judy. you know, there are these lists every year about the most banned books. each and every year, you're in the top five. you're sort of the beatles of
panel people. and as mayor as one of the finite cities in america why are you supporting immigration >> thank you carl. let me repeat my hangz or thanks for julia and kevin. this is the first company i visit in this city and carl thank you. and the carl bishop group is very important working with our chamber of commerce and the other nonprofit. a simple answer is jobs. the reason i'm working on immigration reform. i used to be a civil rights attorney and helped folks to 0 reunite with their families. but at the time the direction connect to the history of the city being a city of immigrants 35 percent of all the small businesses in san francisco was owned by an immigrant. our whole history this city's been built on good immigrants who found ideas and employed others. and today that story has not changed. i think that the businesses in succeed if we have good sound business policies but we make sure there's comprehensive immigration reform. because we've he learned over the years is that there are millions of people in the state of california and undocumented folks in san francisco t
services the united states navy of america. can you believe that the vision and the determination so all one person or maybe 20 thousand can say oh, i'm home. i'm home. it's been an honor to be part of that. thank you all of you and thank everyone who will be and was a part of this thank you. (clapping) >> it's my pleasure to welcome supervisor mar are a cowen. she's actually on many city hall committees and boards. she was elected over the retirement system overseeing $17 billion. where is denise. $17 billion of investment money but here priority is her community. last week the supervisor helped with the family and musical and food festival. whether she's working inside or outside of city hall we know she's working hard to keep our district healthy and save. please welcome supervisor cowen >> yes $17.6 billion but whose counting. i look forward in entertaining a conversation that we will be able to have about using this funds making an investment in the community (clapping) we make investments all around the world with this fund why not no our own neighborhood; right? really putting o
in america. how do he get the conversation from the immigrant conversation without u out of fear to one of hope and about why we're the encounter country in the world. how do we get that conversation reignited here with our folks. i'm proud to be an american and we'll always celebrate the opportunity in this country. so from a senate side we're not going to have family - for many others when we became successful i wanted to share that with our family members. we've also been strong in family where's that tradition. so i want to go back to let's not have immigration reform based on fear but being the open light to the rest of the world. and with the attitude and spirit then you start saying what makes our country successful. it will not discriminate against gaze and lesbians. we can do more in our immigration policies. this is an opportunity in the celebration of our country let's not make decisions out of fear but out of a progressive approach. so we can have the talent and the values of what we believe in to be reflected in a good inhabitation policy >> let's hear from so many of the
rights. for one thing, you get to vote in san francisco. you get to vote in america. and that voting right is so precious. and we saw just a month ago or less than a month ago how we revisited how valuable that voting rights is, and all the sacrifices that heroes of this country had to protect that right for everybody. we want everybody to enjoy that because that gets you a voice and all the things we initially talked about. we want citizens to have a proper rich orientation and training classes that will conduct -- that will be conducted through this initiative, nonpartisan voting, the rights to vote, the right to be educated around every ballot measure that we have, whether it costs you more money or it doesn't cost you anything, or how do we improve muni, whether it costs you more or doesn't cost you anything. how do we do all of that in a much more involved way? education, outreach, more engaging new citizens to mentor and help other eligible immigrants navigate the citizenship application process. we think this is our next big challenge, but opportunity just beyond the work that
. coal is pretty simple stuff. if you can't burn it in america, put it on a train, ship it over to china or india. so, we got market forces. and against that we have to marshal intelligence and collaboration and political response, because this stuff is serious. and the fact that people aren't worried about it and don't talk about it doesn't mean it isn't serious. and that's the insidious character of this -- of this challenge, that some people know about it, 90, 97% of the scientists who deal in climate science all agree that when it comes to doing something it takes leadership. and not just political leadership, but business leadership, church leadership, academic leadership. and that's the context, i believe, in which you have come together. you're focusing on solar energy. that's a big piece. there's plenty of sun out there to take care of our energy. it's going to take time. it's going to take technology. it's going to take scientific breakthroughs, research, and development. and it's going to take storage. and it's going to take various insebastianvv stifle. just in california you
try to reset the and narrative -- reset the narrative, the idea that america is. . it is not broke. our priorities are broken. there is a misplaced obsession with debt and deficits as the national emergency of our time. that has driven the story line inside the beltway. we did a story on how the austerity cost rules washington. it is a portrait of think tanks, philanthropists and others who have framed in a way so it is hard to tell an alternative story. that has shifted a little because of new voices and forces emerging from the 99% or what ever you want to call it. >> you had better have twitter and facebook involved in the project. >> we do, absolutely. we have all kinds of new media. i agree you need to use all of that. it has been a very powerful force. we use all of that at "the nation. " we have a correspondent right about this in a politically. at occupy wall street in new york a few miles from our office, one thing that struck our correspondent was how many young people came to the square and were caught up in conversations, talking to people and the general assembly's, co
, citibank, banc of america, and barry will say more about them in a second. i'm sure i have forgotten something and i apologize in advance, but in the interest of time i will turn it over to barry. thank you. [ applause ] >> yes, to wrap this up here, two lendors on st. anthony's side, the low-income investment fund, nancy andrews is here and the bank of america elizabeth shooten, i believe is here and we want to thank them both. because st. anthony's helps the low-income housing fund get started back in the '90s, we were going to have nancy say just a word or two. nancy. [ applause ] >> thank you everyone and it's just fantastic to see so many san franciscans turn out for this groundbreaking. i am nancy andrews. i'm the president and ceo of the low-income investment fund. we are a san francisco-based community capital non-profit organization and our role in this project was to provide a $10 million allocation of new markets tax credits. you heard leader pelosi speak about the importance of this program. every year the new markets program provides billions of dollars to projects sim
of north america because we had made our aggressive push in the renewable energy, particularly in solar. (applause) >> thank you. and we want other cities to win that title as well. we're not satisfied being the only city in north america that earns that title. we want other cities to earn that as well because that will up the competition, and we like competition in this area. we also passed a business tax exclusion for clean tech firms in our city. we've taken advantage of our position as being in the center for business and innovation to become a hub for international clean tech firm. our historic strength and our city has been in finance, and, so, solar firm are moving here to san francisco to be close to their financial partners and to major utilities and government agencies such as pacific gas and electric, our san francisco public utilities commission, our california public utilities commission as well as the environmental protection agencies. we are now home to more than 35 solar companies and five of the top 10 solar module manufacturers in the world have their offices here in s
points of view and it presented to me this huge canvas of america, you know, that was pretty massive in terms of geography and yet just a small window and we don't see into these people's lives and we don't really know what is happening outside of the frame or where they are going and we don't know anything about them. so i went through exploring places that went from urban areas to small little towns along the border between mexico and the u.s. and a lits dusty towns or right in downtown baltimore and i spent a huge amount of time doing that. so if you think about it, this robot takes the picture and it takes a picture consistently from the same place and it is really i guess objective. more objective than any taking pictures. any journalist would also present a point of view. there is no point of view initially when these pictures were made, but then i am coming in and creating a point of view from within this ocean of imagery. as a flip through a few of these and let you look through these. you can see the city name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city
be here that we decided this weekend to also require the americas cup to celebrate -- to require the san francisco giants to have a play off game, the 49ers to play this weekend, the blue grass festival to be here, the parade, as well as the castro sea fair to coincide and welcome you in style. but i wanted to say a few words about the one thing that keeps me up as the head of the legislative body here in san francisco. the reason why i sit with many of our first responders on our city's disaster council, the reason why a few years ago chief white and i led almost a half a billion dollar bond campaign to rebuild the water, fire, and police infrastructure. about every six months i literally wake up in the middle of the night thinking about what would happen if a disaster struck our city. and i think about this and i think i have these nightmares really for three reasons. one, everyone who lives in san francisco knows that in 1906 we were hit not just by an earthquake, but by an earthquake that led to a fire that burned down literally every single neighborhood in the district that i curren
that there were special events that san francisco will often do. whether it be the america's cup, sunday games, giants streets they will wake up for the car that is typically legally parked on this their street and find out they can't get it back but for a $500 fibromyalgiav. i protionx posed to the public if your community can help us figure out an app so if i provided my cell phone to city government, we can let you know if the street cleaning is going to happen tomorrow. we propose this had last year. mayor lee was supportive. we're still waiting for it to happen, idea number one. idea number two, my constituents ask me can you tell us where every single dollar in city government goes? whether it goes to an individual, nonprofit, someone providing goods and services in our city? last year i proposed an open budget application so that we could drill down and know where every single penny of city government is being spent. i want to thank our budget director who is here, our city controller. we are working on this, but we are still months away from getting the data that we need to provide thi
provided an area that is important. and the context of sea level rise after the america's cup is complete. in terms of overall lessons those are lessons of the plan 127b9d public engagement and it's going to last throughout the project. we've learned that the public expects excellence on the waterfront xylophones. our partners are selected through a fair public process. that b cdc have to be an integral part of this process. and especially, when you're looking at major industries like at pier 70 it's important. the public is increasingly enjoying the project. and we've learned that the design uses can connect the neighborhoods to the waterfront. neck steps we're working together with those promotions and there's a high number of them at the same time. we're trying to implement the land use plan and the other neighborhoods plan. to meet the goals we're looking at potential zoning changes and probably tweaks to the waterfront designing pr we think that some of those changes are likely justified and those sites play an important part in reaching our targets. we still doesn't add up to all th
chiu, he knew that we had to get this done for our great celebration this year which is america's cup. that forced us to have this exciting first phase done. we will talk about a second phase later. i know supervisor chiu is going to welcome you all to his district. he's working very hard with me. we meet every week and he is constantly reminding me about the second phase of this and that, all the investments we have to make. i have already heard it, three times in fact last month and we are working together for the next phase. we have to take this moment to celebrate because without this recognition of how we got here already. it shouldn't take six years but it did. i need to thank a lot of people for that effort. six years of planning with the planning department and working out so many inclusionary meetings with everybody to make sure all of our agencies, the mta and office of economic development and the staff have been wonderful, but it takes a long time for something incredibly potentially interruptive to everything we were able to work through it. sometimes things take a little
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 378 (some duplicates have been removed)